Universal Credit

What is it?

Universal Credit is for people of working age, designed to top up your income to a minimum level and help you with your housing costs (rent and some service charges). Universal Credit is for people on a low to moderate income. It does not matter whether you are working or not, or the reason why you are not working.

Universal Credit is replacing these benefits:

  • Housing Benefit
  • Income Support
  • Income-Based Jobseekers Allowance
  • Income-Related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Working Tax Credit

IMPORTANT: Universal Credit does not include help with your Council Tax. You must claim Council Tax Support separately, from your local council.

Universal Credit is paid in one lump sum and on a monthly basis, and includes help to pay your rent. This help isn’t paid separately, like Housing Benefit. And usually all the Universal Credit is paid straight to you, so you have to pay your rent out of this money.

Most people will get the same amount of money as they would have under the benefits listed above – it just looks like more because of the benefits all being paid together, including help with your housing costs (rent, mortgage interest and some service charges) and is paid monthly, all at once.

See the Frequently Asked Questions for how to get help with managing the change to Universal Credit.

 

When is Universal Credit being introduced?

Universal Credit is being rolled out in 3 stages

Step 1 is complete – Universal Credit is now available in all areas of Great Britain – but only for certain people.

Step 2 The ‘full’ (digital) Universal Credit service is being introduced across Great Britain between May 2016 and December 2018.

The ‘full’ (digital) Universal Credit service starts in Wythenshawe on 25/07/2018

This means that if a change in your circumstances means you need to make a new claim for any of the benefits which are being replaced by Universal Credit – you will make a claim for Universal Credit instead (unless you have 3 or more children).

Step 3 If you are working age and still getting any of the benefits which are being replaced by Universal Credit then, at some point between 2019 and 2023 you will be asked to make a claim for Universal Credit instead. The DWP call this stage ‘migration’.

 

Now that my area is ‘digital’ will I have to claim Universal Credit straight away?

You will only need to claim Universal Credit if a change in your circumstances means you would normally need to make a new claim for any of the benefits which are being replaced by Universal Credit.

So, for example, if your Income Related Employment and Support Allowance ends because you have been found fit for work, you will not be able to make to make a new claim for Income Based Jobseekers Allowance – this will have to be Universal Credit instead. If you make a claim for Universal Credit and you have been getting Housing Benefit and / or Child Tax Credit, these will stop too. Even if you appeal the Employment and Support Allowance decision and you win your appeal, if you have claimed Universal Credit you will not be able to go back onto Employment and Support Allowance, but your Universal Credit award may increase and your Claimant Commitment should be amended to reflect that you are no longer claiming as a jobseeker.

If your Employment and Support Allowance ends because you are found fit for work, contact us for advice. Some people, depending on their circumstances, might be better off if they do not make a new claim for benefit while they are waiting for the first part of the challenging process (known as mandatory reconsideration) to be completed. Once they have the mandatory reconsideration decision, they can lodge an appeal. They can then request payments of their ESA to be reinstated. As long as they have not made a claim for Universal Credit, and they are not affected by the ‘repeat fit for work decision’ rules (check with us if you are not sure), their ESA can be put back into payment. And if they have provided 'fit' (sick) notes since their ESA ended, they can receive payments covering the whole period. Anyone who decides this is the better option for them should ensure their Housing Benefit claim continues by letting the Housing Benefit office know they have no income until they can get payments of their ESA claim re-started.

Another change which would mean you need to make a claim for Universal Credit would be if you get Housing Benefit and you move to another rented house in a different local authority area, which has the ‘digital’ Universal Credit service, then you would have to claim Universal Credit instead of making a new claim for Housing Benefit; any Income Support / Income Related Employment and Support Allowance / Income Based Jobseekers Allowance or Tax Credits would also end.

However, if you have 3 or more children you will not be able to make a new claim for Universal Credit before the end of January 2019; instead, you will be told to claim Child Tax Credit and whichever of the following other benefits that would be appropriate for you instead: Housing Benefit; Income Support; Income Related Employment and Support Allowance; Income Based Jobseekers Allowance or Working Tax Credit.

If you are already getting the benefits which are being replaced by Universal Credit and you continue to be entitled to these you may not need to claim Universal Credit until the ‘migration’ stage, sometime between 2019 and 2023.

However, when the ‘digital’ service comes to your area, if you choose to move onto Universal Credit you can do so (unless you have 3 or more children) – you do not need to wait until a change in your circumstances means you have to. So you could get advice to check if you would be better off on Universal Credit – but seek advice before making any decisions!

 

How can I prepare for Universal Credit?

To prepare for Universal Credit think about:

  • How you would manage to make a claim on-line – where you can go if you don’t have your own computer.
  • Where you can go to build up your computer skills if you’ve never been online before.
  • Setting up an email address – you will need to have one to be able to claim Universal Credit.
  • How you will manage when the benefits that Universal Credit is replacing are paid to you as one payment on a monthly basis.
  • How you will manage until you have received your first monthly payment (it will probably be a longer gap between payments than you have been used to – and the first payment will be one month and 7 days after your claim).
  • How you will manage when you have to pay your rent to your landlord yourself.
  • Opening a bank or credit union account. “Basic” bank accounts don’t allow you to overdraw but still charge for unmet direct debits (if there’s not enough money in the account when they come out).

See the Frequently Asked Questions for more information and advice on the help you might be able to receive. If you would like to talk through some of these issues, please don’t hesitate to please contact the Financial Inclusion Team on 0300 111 000 (Parkway Green) or 0800 633 5500 (Willow Park).